Homemade Butter

Homemade butter

I think it's time to finally say hi and break my radio silence. Also, I would like to wish you all a very late happy New Year. I hope your new year has started out fantastic!

I can't believe January is almost over!

I've been struggling with lack of inspiration and motivation, and that's the reason why I haven't been updating my blog lately. I have to say, though, that I've been missing you and my little blog.
Luckily, my very dear friend Giulia came to London on a working holiday. I always enjoy the time we spend together working on new ideas, brainstorming, cooking and laughing. Isn't that exactly all you need when you are looking for inspiration everywhere, but can't seem to find any?

double cream for homemade butter


New motivation didn't come easy to me though. I must admit that Juls and P. basically blackmailed me into working on a new projects and posts. I want to thank them for that!

Back to basics! 

Complicated projects are not ideal for times when you get stuck. Just get back to basics. Start adding more, little by little. I'm not an expert on "getting stuck situations", but this worked for me. 

I decided to get back to basics. I've been planning on making homemade butter for sooooo long.


Butter_Phases
Butter Last Phase
Straining buttermilk from butter


What ingredients do you always have in your fridge? I usually have eggs, cheese, fresh vegetables and butter in my fridge. As Julia Child said, "Butter makes everything taste better". 

Homemade butter is, however, completely different experience. It's so creamy and silky with a hint of Maldon sea salt. Add freshly baked bread and I'm sold! If that's not enough for you, head over to Juls' blog to add just one more ingredient to create an easy sandwich bursting with flavours. 


Buttermilk
Homemade butter with bread

You can very easily prepare butter using your food processor or blender.  Using a shaking technique is much more fun and it's a perfect arms workout. I felt like I spent an hour in the gym the next day after making the butter. Somebody could say it's a bit too much of a hassle for butter,  but believe me, it is well worth it.

Homemade butter


Butter
yields about 90g butter

250ml double cream
Maldon sea salt to taste

Pour the double cream into a jar. The jar should be at least one third larger than the amount of double cream. Put a lid on, and start shaking the jar. After 2-3 minutes, the cream should be quite thick and nicely whipped. Continue shaking, until the cream starts to pull away from the sides of the glass. At this point it's quite hard to shake the jar, so it's easier and more effective to tap the jar firmly on a table covered with a thick layer of tea towels. Be careful not to brake the jar. Continue to tap the jar, turning it upside down and back as you go, until the buttermilk starts separating from the butter.  Pour the buttermilk into another container (you can use the buttermilk later) and shake the jar a few more times to separate as much of buttermilk as possible.
Pour cold water into the jar to wash the butter. Pour off the water. Use a spoon or spatula to squeeze out as much buttermilk out of the butter as possible. Wash again until the water is clear. When the butter is clean, mix in salt to taste and refrigerate.
You can also add herbs or garlic if you like.


25 comments :

  1. Amazing photos of what I imagine is a difficult subject to make photogenic!

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  2. I definitely know what you mean by being lost in the middle of busy days, time moving fast and lack of inspiration. Going back to basics is for sure a good idea! I have really missed your posts, and I'm glad to see you back here! What a lovely set of photos - really made me want to try it myself. I've never made butter, and now I'm wondering why not!

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  3. Gorgeously atmospheric clicks! Homemade butter is wonderful.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  4. Great post, wonderful photos, Sari! Welcome back! I always look forward to reading your new posts.

    I also loved the sandwich post at Juls' blog. I commented it that I'm vegetarian but I would have eaten that sandwich with you, guys, at the beach! :)

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  5. I'd never thought about making my own butter before, but your pictures look so great that I'm going to give it a try!

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  6. Beautiful, Sarka!
    I've been meaning to make my own butter for some time now!
    Keep motivated!
    x

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  7. Didn't know it was possible to make homemade butter but after reading all process.... you must end completely destroyed!
    Love your pics.

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  8. I love this post, Sari! Thanks for passing along the inspiration! x

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  9. Yum! I love how you essentially workout to get butter :) Justification!!
    Have you tried making butter from cultured cream? Apparently you can use creme fraiche or leave your cream out for 8hrs or so (says Nourished Traditions). I haven't tried making it, but love the flavour!

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  10. Gorgeous photos. As a child I would make the butter for the family table with the shake the jar method. Now I use my Thermomix. I don't get a good arm workout though. I'm now experimenting with making cultured butter.It makes a slightly more complex butter. I haven't perfected it yet but I think I'm nearly there.

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  11. I read the story finding out the secret ingredient...
    At first time it looks like it is just double cream.
    But second time I found it out: ARMS!
    ;-)

    Thanks for the simple recipe and the beautiful pics from Firenze!

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  12. My mom used to make butter and ghee at home. I am so tempted to try this at home!

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  13. how great --you really just need a jar! Just one question: what's the fat content of double crem? I want to find out what it corresponds to here in Italy. Thanks.

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  14. I've made homemade butter a few times in the food processor--it seems to take longer than I'd expect so I have been hesitant to try by hand. On the other hand, it looks like a lot fewer dishes to clean up. Maybe when my boys get a little older I can enlist their aid as I can imagine my arm getting tired already! Love the photos--as always.

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  15. Such an inspirational post, amazing pictures, congratulations! I must try home made butter, but what can I use instead of double cream butter that we don't have in Italy?

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  16. Thank you everyone for your nice comments! I'm happy you didn't gave up on me after such long radio silence! :)

    @Valeria, @Elena - you can use your normal fresh cream. The fat content should be the same as in British double cream. Double cream has usually fat content between 38-50%.

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  17. La mantequilla hecha en casa es magnífico,es una perfección,mi madre la preparaba de la nata que sacaba diariamente de sus vacas en le campo,realmente te felicito por esta elaboración,abrazos

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  18. Lovely blog .... This post reminds me of my childhood . My mother wld collect cream from full fat milk and every week make fresh butter. She still does. The texture and taste is priceless !!

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  19. I shook too much and it turned into whipped cream! It was pretty exciting though when it seperated. Next time I'll pour out the buttermilk as soon as it seperated.

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    1. Really? I didn't know you can whip up buttermilk. In theory it shouldn't be possible since it has already separated and most of fat it gone. Did you get butter in the end?

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  20. Mine never seperated at all. I have whipped cream lol! I put a couple of marbles in the jar. Shook that jar till it was soo thick nothing moved. Maybe that wasn't enuf? I want to try again but I don't want to waste. Any tips on what I am doing wrong?

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    1. Sounds like you were not shaking the jar long enough. It becomes very thick at some point that it stops moving. However, you have to keep shaking or tapping the jar on a table (covered with a thick layer of tea towel) until it starts separating. You can also try using a mixer or food processor.

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  21. Curious, what is double cream, different I'm assuming than regular cream?

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    1. Double cream has higher fat content, usually somewhere between between 38-50%.

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