Gooseberry sorbet


Gooseberry sorbet

I can't believe how quickly time flies. I had been waiting for summer what seemed like forever, and suddenly it's the middle of July. We have quite mild summer this year, at least for my taste. I'm a summer kind of girl and I love hot summer months with temperatures around 30C. But it's just not a case of British summer. Unfortunately, we even don't plan any summer holiday this year which means I have to be happy with British summer.

Gooseberries

Absence of super hot summer days of course doesn't stop me from enjoying typical summer tastes and treats like ice creams and sweet juicy fruits. My favourite pick your own farm supplies me with summer fruit and vegetable that we don't grow in our small kitchen garden. I really enjoy picking seasonal fruit and veg and turning them into delicious meals.

A typical summer fruit which is difficult to find in local supermarkets is gooseberry. It's quite underestimated fruit but it's so delicious and packed with vitamin C. Many people don't like gooseberries for their typical tart taste, but I can eat kilos of them. As I've already said in my last blog post, gooseberries were one of my favourite fruit when I was a kid and they bring so many memories from my childhood. I would always pick and eat gooseberries straight off the bush in my grandparent's garden.

Gooseberry plant
Barley field
Goat

P. and I always try to spend as much time in nature as possible during weekends. Quite often our weekend trips lead us to the nearest pick your own farm. We picked so many gooseberries last time that I decided to make a gooseberry sorbet. I've never tried to make gooseberry sorbet before and I was really surprised how delicious it was. It's very refreshing not overly sweet sorbet and same as all sorbets it's very easy to make.

Gooseberry sorbet
gooseberry sorbet

Gooseberry sorbet

800g fresh gooseberries, topped and tailed
300g golden caster sugar
300ml water

Put sugar and water in a medium sauce pan, heat over medium heat and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Add gooseberries, bring to the boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Let it cool down slightly before pureeing in a blender or food processor. Press the mixture through a sieve into a bowl, squeezing out as much juices as possible. Leave the puree to cool completely, then pour into a freezer safe container and place in a freezer. When the sorbet starts to freeze around the edges, take it out of the freezer and stir with a fork to break up any frozen sections. Return to the freezer and repeat the process until the sorbet is completely frozen.
If you are using ice cream maker, churn according to the machine instruction.




33 comments :

  1. Gooseberries were my favorites too as a small girl, well I like them quite a lot now too

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  2. Oooh I've never had a gooseberry before, I have to go seek them out! We're having a mild summer here too, which isn't helping our tomatoes to ripen...I'm getting impatient! ;)

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  3. I love gooseberries. They are some of my favorite berries. That sorbet must be delicious!

    What a cute goat!

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  4. beautiful as always miss. I can get gooseberries here but they are so so tart. My boyfriend (from England) says we should make jams. This looks super lovely though.

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  5. Your images of the grains and that goat are a wonderful addition to - gorgeous! - this sweet story.

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  6. i´ve never had this gooseberries before too, but this recipe seems delicious, i love sorbets!

    have a great weekend!

    Sílvia

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  7. This is so gorgeous Sari! I have enjoyed the winter here in Sydney so far, but looking forward to spring also! I hope summer stays around for a bit longer for you guys though ;-) Have a lovely weekend! x

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  8. @Ilva - I don't really understand why people don't eat them nowadays. They are such a humble yet delicious fruit.

    @Danielle - I'm sure you will love gooseberries. They are very nice when they are fully ripen, tart but sweet. I was thinking the same about our tomatoes. Frequent rain made our tomato plants well watered but the lack of sunshine is not helping them to ripen. I'm so impatient! :)

    @Rosa - You should give the sorbet a try if you like gooseberries. It's delicious.

    @Nicole Franzen {La Buena Vida} - Thank you Nicole! :) Gooseberries should be tart but also sweet when they are fully ripen. Your boyfriend is right, gooseberry jam is amazing. My grandma used to make gooseberry jam and I loved it.

    @Melinaphotos - Thank you Melina! We met the goat during one of our weekend trip. It was difficult to photograph as the goat was too curious and didn't stand still for a second! :)

    @raspberry essence - Thank you for stopping by and commenting, Silvia. Have a nice weekend too!

    @Maria - I think I would enjoy Australian winter too. It has nothing to do with European winter, does it? Not even mentioning Finnish winter! :) Have a wonderful weekend! xx

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  9. I've never had a gooseberry! I've never even seen one in the grocery store. I am missing something for sure, because this sorbet looks wonderful! :)

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  10. oh it's so hard to find gooseberries in Italy :( I would really love to try this sorbet, looks amazing and sooo refreshing! I'll have to be happy with other berries...

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  11. You have such a beautiful space here. followed you from gawker and I was so glad I did! The sorbet looks lovely and just like you I love summer.. warm weather .. clear blue sky :)

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  12. I adore gooseberries - but now live in the USA and can't get them here. This sorbet really makes me mouth water. Yum! Have another bowl for me :=D

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  13. Summer is the perfect season for sorbets! And this one looks great. The gooseberries are a bit rare here but I'll look for them, surely.

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  14. I remember doing exactly same thing with gooseberries when I was little:) I would always eat them straight from the bushes they were growing on...
    btw I love the pictures!:) and I'm very curious how does the sorbet tastes like...

    An Interesting Distraction

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  15. Gooseberries used to be my granddad's favourite berries, I can still remember the bush we had in the garden! I loved to pick them and eat them straight off the bush! what a sweet memory you reminded me! I'd be curious to taste it, it seems really refreshing!

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  16. What beautiful pictures! Just discovered your blog and can't stop reading :-) I love gooseberries too - my mum always used to make fool with them when we were little, and refused to add much sugar so that the sourness almost pinched our faces when we ate! As she's got older she's mellowed out a little, and adds a bit more sugar - might have to put her onto this recipe here!

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  17. I have to say I was completely taken with your first photo, it's absolutely stunning! All of you photos are beautiful though.

    I've never had gooseberries before, but the idea of a sorbet sounds great. Yum!

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  18. What do you think?

    http://lendryggen.blogspot.com/2011/07/zielono-mi.html

    :))

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  19. Looks delicious! We love your photos.

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  20. Thank you everyone for your comments!

    @Valeria, @Ruth, @Blanka- it seems to me that gooseberries are quite rare everywhere nowadays. Other berries like raspberries, blackberries and strawberries took their place in gardens and people don't appreciate this wonderful berry anymore

    @kankana - thank you stopping here and for your nice words. I hope your summer is hot with blue sky! :)

    @Martaaa - I just loved picking and eating fresh gooseberries when I was little. i'm glad to hear we share this memory! :) Let me know if you make the sorbet. Would love to know what you think.

    @Juls @ Juls' Kitchen - do you still have the bush in your garden? I can try to save some sorbet for you! :)

    @thelittleloaf - Hi and welcome to my little creative space! Your story about your mum making sour gooseberry fool made me smile. Would love to taste you mum's fool. I've never tried to make it.

    @Jennifer (Delicieux) - Thank you for the nice words. I'm really glad you like my pictures!

    @Praline - I checked out your blog and the sorbet looks great! I hope you liked it.

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  21. I grew up not knowing these at all - we had cape gooseberries only (Physalis) so I am still fascinated by these green berries that look like Chinese lanterns or Christmas baubles to me! Love the sound of the sorbet (and that bowl!)

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  22. I love gooseberries too, although they're not easy to find here... And seriously; I could eat a gooseberry sorbet rain or sunshine! Looks fabulous!

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  23. Very riveting article. This is a really absorbing post. I will come again in future.

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  24. I have never seen gooseberries and have only come to know them through blogs like yours. I would love to try them. They seem like berries of fairy tales.

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  25. I just finished making some of this using your recipe. Didnt have caster sugar so i just pulsed normal sugar in a blender. Ive always loved gooseberries and my dad makes delicious ice gooseberry pie! Yum :D i too eat them off the bush but i've been told they can give you stomach aches. Never happened to me personally. Thanks for the recipe! Sorbet is freezing and will be reading tomorrow!!

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  26. iced* ready*

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  27. @Rob - Hi Rob, I hope you like the sorbet. I'd love to taste your dad's ice gooseberry pie, sounds great! I actually never heard that gooseberries can give you a stomach aches. It definitely never happened to me and I ate a lot of them! :)

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  28. yep. Sure was good. Definitely a keeper! Thanks :)

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  29. Amazing!i picked so many gooseberries last yr from my mums garden that they almost went off in the fridge :O but i ended up making a pretty good gooseberry chutney with them. I think i'll be trying this this year though! I also took some cuttings from my mum's bushes last year, they root so easily, I now have about 8 plants growing away! looing forward to when they are big enough for fruit :) if u find a gooseberry bush and you want to grow yr own, cut off a few 12inch sticks in Nov when they are dormant, stick em in the ground and wait!lovely pics :)

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  30. @Jarra -Thank you for the tip! I wish I knew that in November, I guess it's too late now. Gooseberry chutney sounds delicious.

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  31. I made this recipe with this year's gooseberries! Perfectly smooth, not grainy like recipes with too much water, or uncooked sugar. About to try it with blueberries. Any suggestions? I might add the blueberries after a minute or two of cooking, since I think they need less cooking. Thoughts?

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    Replies
    1. So happy to hear you liked the sorbet! I would be curious to know how it worked with blueberries. They certainly don't need to be cooked for 5 minutes.

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